Aquincum

This area of the Pannonian region was at first settled by a celtic tribe (Eravasci). Around a.d. 41-54, 600 men of a Roman legion stationed here and gradually the city rises around the military settlement. In a.d 106 Aquincum became the Capital city of the Pannonian Inferior region. This area today is situated in the Óbuda district within Budapest. Acquincum is the Roman civil settlement, well-conserved throughout the centuries and converted today into a museum with inside and open-air sections. The Roman Ruins in Aquincum have been dated around the II and III century (a.d.). This area was the focal point of the commercial life of the Pannonian province. During the excavation works, the archaeologists have discovered many objects and monuments that testify the glory of this age. The ancient town had paved street and lavish houses with fountains, courtyards and mosaic pavements. Although today not all of those marvels remain intact, it is possible to distinguish their structure, such as the the market (Macellum), the public baths, the christian church and a temple dedicated to God Mitra, the most important divinity that in that period competed against christianism on this territory. The Aquincum museum (Aquincumi Múzeum), built at the south western edge of the ruins of the settlement, permits to contextualize the finds thanks to an outstanding collection of coins and mural paintings. A professional Budapest tourguide can show you the copy of the portable organ and the mosaic that shows how it worked. Settled at the north west of the ruins beyond the shafts of a roman aqueduct, rises the civil amphitheater where it is still possible today to see the cells in which the lions were kept and the death gate through which the corpses of the dead gladiators were transported. This is the biggest and most important monument discovered. It was realized during the I century (a.d). Its dimensions are 130x110 meters and its capacity is about 16.000 people. Another great discovery is the three-level aqueduct. The Aquincum Museum shelters a reconstruction of the hydraulic system, roman houses and the paintings that have been recovered.

Shoes on the Danube

This monument by Gyula Pauer (2006) is located just under the Parliament along the Danube bank. This is a memorial for the hungarian jews that were shot and thrown in the river by the nazis in 1944. The touching monument reproduce 60 shoes in bronze, abandoned by the victims. Maybe if you ask your private Budapest guide, then he will show you this place to you on the tour.

Bridges of Budapest

Budapest is also known as the city of the bridges: the city is crossed by seven bridges that connect Buda to Pest.

The Chain Bridge:

Budapest’s first permanent crossing over the Danube river was completed in 1849 as a marvel of the 19th century’s technological advancements. Its name comes from the iron chains, on which the road-bed hangs. The chains are held by two 48-meter river piers in classicist style. At the time of its construction, the Chain Bridge was the suspension bridge with the second-largest span all over the world. The stone lions took their place only in 1852. They luckily survived the devastation of World War II. According to a legend, the lions of the Chain Bridge do not have tongues. The legend lacks any factual basis: in fact the lions do have their tongues but it is only possible to see their tongues from above!

Opera House

When it was opened in 1884, the city shared the administrative duties of the Austro-Hungarian Empire with Vienna. Emperor Franz Joseph commissioned its design to the architect Miklós Ybl. The construction included the use of marble and frescos by some of the best artisans of that era. It's one of the most beautiful neo-renaissance buildings in Europe. The Opera House praises also the third best acoustic in Europe. The facade is decorated with well-known figures of the opera: Liszt, Mozart, Verdi, Puccini and so on... Prepare yourself to be fascinated by the theatre, with the marble columns, the golden roof, the frescos and the chandeliers. Even if you couldn’t find a ticket to a play, don’t miss out on the guided tour.When it was opened in 1884, the city shared the administrative duties of the Austro-Hungarian Empire with Vienna. Emperor Franz Joseph commissioned its design to the architect Miklós Ybl. The construction included the use of marble and frescos by some of the best artisans of that era. If we are on a voyage in Budapest, we definitely have to visit the Opera house, because this is one of the most beautiful neo-renaissance building in Europe. The Opera House praises also the third best acoustic in Europe. The facade is decorated with well-known figures of the opera: Liszt, Mozart, Verdi, Puccini and so on... Prepare yourself to be fascinated by the theatre, with the marble columns, the golden roof, the frescos and the chandeliers. Even if you couldn’t find a ticket to a play, don’t miss out on the guided tour.

Andrassy Avenue and Hero's Square

Andrássy Avenue is an elegant 2.5 km long tree-lined avenue that reaches out from Deák Ferenc tér to the City park. During a trip in Budapest we can pleasant things to see what became a UNESCO World Heritage site. The avenue is home to museums (House of Terror), magnificent buildings (Opera House), boutiques and cafés. At the end, the avenue opens out to the Hero's square which is the main entrance to the city park. The Millenary Monument erected in the center of the square in 1896 in honour of the ancestors of the homeland, commemorates the 1000th anniversary of the arrival of Hungarian tribes in the Carpathian Basin. This square is one of the most visited sights in Budapest. The square is surrounded by two important buildings, the Museum of Fine Arts on the left and the Kunsthalle (Hall of Art) on the right. The Heroes’ Square is also a station of the Millennium Underground (the first underground in Europe after the one of London).

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